Complete Information on Indonesia

Posts tagged ‘Public transport’

Indonesia is designed for Indonesian

A country is its people, or its people is the country? Nevertheless, every country has their everything designed for their people. In countries like the United States, for example, the design of its door is tall and wide. This is because most people living in the United States are tall and most are fat.

It is fine if you are shorter than most people living in America because you do not need to worry about getting head bumps when you enter a door.
But if a tourist from the America or Europe comes to Indonesia, then you have to watch out a little.

Another thing to know is when you use public transportation like a bus. If it’s crowded, then you will realize that you are either too big or too wide to sit in the chairs designed for 1 person for each chair.

The size of the chair might be too small for non-Indonesian

The size of the chair might be too small for non-Indonesian

This can be a rather big issue for the Indonesian government especially the one who deals with tourism. Surely, the chair size fits most Indonesian people and thus it is efficient as it can carry as many people as it can, but the possibility of tourists using it must have been considered too.

But then again, there is always alternative instead of using the public transportation. Tourists can always use a taxi or rental car as it will prove to be more efficient and not tiring if compared to traveling in a bus.

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

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Indonesian people are very tolerant, or too tolerant?

In many countries, if you are late to work or if you make a little mistake, they can be very intolerant. They will scold you immediately and harshly. All of them seek perfection from their workers or employees.

In Indonesia, however, if you are late to work because you got stuck in a traffic jam or you make mistakes, you won’t get scolded directly even though it depends on who your boss is or whether he/she is a temperamental person or not. This is because Indonesian people are very tolerant. They realize that people make mistakes and it really is not their place to scold those people as they surely make mistakes too once or twice in a while.

Motivating employer

Tolerance, after all, is one of the Indonesian’s best traits that will make all Indonesians proud wherever they are. But the bad thing is that if those things are tolerated too much, the people might be so laid-back. They become a person who would not worry at all even if they make a mistake. Maybe this is why Indonesian people are so relaxed and laid-back. It is because they are not afraid getting scolded by their bosses.

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

 

‘Insya Allah’, the cliche in Indonesia

Almost all people in the hard working country like Japan or New York think that they should have everything planned out before they do it. Because they think, doing something without planning it beforehand, can be disastrous, especially when it is a crucial plan for something big.

Planning before implementing

Planning before implementing

But in Indonesia, as you might have guessed, most Indonesian people do not plan. The idea of planning something beforehand is considered ridiculous. Why? Because they believe that even though everything is planned neatly, the implementation might go awry or that the result is different from what is expected in the plan.

So, when you are in a team of wedding organizers, for example, you might be surprised with the answer “Insya Allah” even though the question demands the answer only between ‘yes’ or ‘no’. “Do you really believe we can get this stuff done on time?”. The answer to that question is only ‘yes’ or ‘no’. But often, you will hear “Insya Allah”.

‘Insya Allah’ means ‘only by God’s permission’ or ‘only if God permits’. In other words, it basically means that you let everything decided by God or by nature or fate.
It has become a cliche as it has been used so much that it has lost its real meaning.

If you ask an Indonesian to meet you the day after somewhere, most of them will not directly answer “Yes, I will come” or “Sorry, I can’t come tomorrow”. Rather, they would answer “Insya Allah”. Thus, you cannot really blame them if they do not come the day after because it is raining hard.

If you ever got asked by someone whether you can come tomorrow or not, you can answer “Insya Allah” if you are not sure.

A little comic about 'Insya Allah'

A little comic about ‘Insya Allah’

In the first box, the girl asks the green man whether he will go to a meeting or not, and the green man answers “Insya Allah”.
In the second one, the girl says “Okay, see you later then.”
After that, the girl is confused and want to ask again. In the last panel, she asks whether it is “Insya Allah yes I will come” or the opposite.

This habit of Indonesian people, let it be on purpose or not, does have a bad effect as it reflects that Indonesian people are not really people with planning. They let the nature of fate and adapt to the situation and condition. Maybe this is why Indonesian people are so panicky in most events.

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

Dishwasher without electricity? What for?

In the United States or other countries, dishwasher is considered to be the most useful thing. People eat two to three times per day, and of course, they eat by using plates, spoons, and forks.
That also means they need extra energy to wash their dishes later on after eating, but that hassle could be good as gone if they have a dishwasher.

But do you know that in Indonesia, a dishwasher does not have any value at all? This is because not all people in Indonesia can afford to have a dishwasher in their kitchen.
In fact, not all family or houses has a kitchen. Even if they have a decent kitchen, it is not worth the electricity to run it as it will cause a blackout because the electric current is not enough.

All places in Indonesia must suffer from a blackout every now and then, and it is far worse in the remote areas. While Jakarta can have blackout once per month, remote areas can have blackout twice or thrice per week.
Since Java island is the centralized and concentrated one, it does not have as many blackouts as in other places in Indonesia. On Sumatra island, the blackout can occur once a week and for a long time like 1 to 8 hours. Think about the money and time lost just for one blackout.

However, the Indonesian people are quick in recognizing business opportunities. Besides candle, a genset is what everybody needs. Every big factory and office building or malls usually have this genset as their backup source of electricity in case of blackout. This is why the genset market in Indonesia is very wide.

Unfortunately, knowing the importance of genset does not mean that everybody in Indonesia has one. Like in the video below, a football stadium does not have a genset and thus have nothing to do when the blackout happens.

But then again, that can also mean that there will still be potential buyers, right?

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

Public transportation in Indonesia has its level increased

Public transportation anywhere in the world has always been praised for being advanced, practical, and clean. Those three features, after all, are the ones that make people choose to ride public transportation rather than driving with their own vehicle.

But when you come to Indonesia, specifically to Padang, West Sumatra, you will be awed by a new level of public transportation which does not boast about its cleanliness and practicality.

Padang, West Sumatra

Padang, West Sumatra

What you will see is art. The public transportation there, the ‘angkot‘ (‘angkutan kota’ / town transportation), has a paint job and vinyls here and there, making it look like a racing car. They also have TV, sound system, and speakers or subwoofers, colorful lights, to make the vehicle become a moving place for disco. All of them are designed for customers to enjoy the ride.

The downside of this is that they have to fill or change their accumulator because it surely wastes a big amount of it by turning on the TV, subwoofers, and the lights. However, considering the amount of customers they could get by this modification, a little extra money spent for the accumulator is not really a big deal.

(See this video below about the ‘angkot‘ in Padang)

It is so hilarious that you can’t help but being curious, right? Well, that’s another uniqueness of Indonesia.

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

Modified transporter in Indonesia

We all know now that in Indonesia, the best transportation would be ‘ojek’ or motor taxi, because it can slip past the traffic jam quickly. You can read this post to know more about it. At most, they can bring 2 to 3 people at once or some things.

But do you know that somewhere in Tasikmalaya, there is a modified transporter? It is an ordinary transporter but they can bring many people at once like 7 – 10 people, and they can even bring  many woodblocks.

Cipatujah, Tasikmalaya, Indonesia

Say hello to these brave people who risk their lives and their motors to transport these people and heavy woodblocks.

Usually, they are paid for IDR 150.000 – 250.000 ( US $ 15 – 25 ) per trip, but is it really worth the danger? How would they turn their motor? How would they brake and have the woodblocks unmoved when they brake in a downhill slope?

They reflect the needs of efficiency for Indonesian people. They realize that to transport many people or things, they need to go back and forth several times, and that is a waste of gasoline. Then, they take the market opportunity to transport all at once or in one trip. Pretty uniquely clever, right?

(See this video about them, they can even go through bumpy roads and still keep their balance)

Well, Indonesia is really a place with countless uniqueness, right?

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

The bad economy is caused by national holidays?

On average, the national holidays of any country in the world are around 10-15 days per year. This creates a good place for competition in factory or other industries, because the less national holidays they have, the more productions can be made. Countries like China, has its workers work 48 hours per week, and the workers are paid based on how many pieces of clothing they make in a clothing factory. You can imagine the efficiency and the productivity, right?

National holidays

But do you know that in Indonesia, the national holidays are around 28-32 days per year. This is because Indonesia embraces its diversity in religions by celebrating each religion’s big day as national holidays. Not to mention, Indonesia has a strange day called ‘stuck’ day. It’s a normal working day but can be declared as a holiday because that day is in the middle of national holidays. So, for example, Sunday is a holiday and the Tuesday is one of the national holidays, then the Monday will be a holiday too.

Red date

One can safely think that Indonesian people are very laid-back. Not only the national holidays have given Indonesian people enough leisure, the factory workers only work for 40 hours per week and yet, they still complain about it. This, of course, affects Indonesian’s economy. How would Indonesia compete with other developing countries if the national holiday system itself is too laid back? But then again, thanks to that system, one can really have a laid-back life and truly enjoy the leisure of holidays.

(See this video below about the latest decision from the President of Indonesia regarding the worker day to be a national holiday)

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

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