Complete Information on Indonesia

Posts tagged ‘bajaj’

Indonesian people are very tolerant, or too tolerant?

In many countries, if you are late to work or if you make a little mistake, they can be very intolerant. They will scold you immediately and harshly. All of them seek perfection from their workers or employees.

In Indonesia, however, if you are late to work because you got stuck in a traffic jam or you make mistakes, you won’t get scolded directly even though it depends on who your boss is or whether he/she is a temperamental person or not. This is because Indonesian people are very tolerant. They realize that people make mistakes and it really is not their place to scold those people as they surely make mistakes too once or twice in a while.

Motivating employer

Tolerance, after all, is one of the Indonesian’s best traits that will make all Indonesians proud wherever they are. But the bad thing is that if those things are tolerated too much, the people might be so laid-back. They become a person who would not worry at all even if they make a mistake. Maybe this is why Indonesian people are so relaxed and laid-back. It is because they are not afraid getting scolded by their bosses.

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

 

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The sharp trap of hell in Indonesia

There are many markets or business opportunities that are still unseen or hidden from most people’s eyes.
Indonesian people, however, are very keen on seeing them.
Like an artisan coffee seller with bicycle, not long after that, there comes an herbal drink seller with bicycle.
Or the growing-to-be-famous online shop with unique stuffs.

But, there are some people who create the opportunity in the wrong way, like these people mentioned in this post.
Flat tire issues do not always happen, so these people are actually experiencing a great deficit.
So, what do they do? They scatter nails on the road or the street not far from their patch-up places.

The nails collected by officers from the street

The nails collected by an officer from the street

Try to drive in a 30 km/hours, and pay careful attention to the street.

If your vehicle got the nail, don’t panic and try to pull over after you are sure it’s safe, and take the nail. If you insist on driving, the tire can tear and become worse.

When you get your tire patched up, watch carefully because often they will sabotage your tire and make it worse. Thus, you have to pay more to change to a new tire with the price ranging from IDR 30.000 to IDR 45.000 ( $US 3 to 4,5).

The officers from a community once collected 300 kg worth of nails just in the area of Central Jakarta.
Some streets that are usually scattered in nail are the Daan Mogot, Hasyim Ashari, Medan Merdeka Utara, Senen market area, Pulogadung area, and Cawang area.

(See this video below about the nails scattered on the street to Soekarno Hatta airport)

Sure, it is great to be able to create the business opportunity which means more income or benefits. But doing it with this kind of act is really unacceptable, isn’t it?

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

Jokowi will apply study curfew

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TEMPO.COJakarta – The governor of DKI, Joko Widodo, will apply hours special for studying for the students. The goal is to minimize the negative acts that can potentially be done by the students, like skipping class and ends with brawl.

“But this is not a night curfew, it’s different.” said Jokowi, his close nickname after attending the religious interpretations chamber meeting in the Istora Senayan with the Vice president Boediono, Ahad, September 15 2013. The point of this program, Jokowi continued, is how the students can be disciplined.

For instance, as he gives an example, when it’s class time, a student is forbidden to be outside without a good reason. “It does feel ordinary like the one which has been applied now,” he said. It’s just, Jokowi affirms, that this study curfew will monitor the students outside.

The existing rule is still considered loose. Students can still wander outside at the class time. They are just caught if they do make mischiefs or there was a raid.

But, Jokowi does not want to be in haste to validate the study curfew program.
He said , his party must ask first the opinions from all parties. “(We) need to talk with the Education Office, also the school committee and the parents”, he said.

According to this Gadjah Mada University of Forestry faculty graduate, students must be trained to struggle. He asks that parents should not spoil their children.

Source : http://www.tempo.co

The most sacred word in Indonesia : traffic jam

Punctuality has always been one of the main keys to be successful in work or business. In Japan, for example, 1 minute late can make you have to apologize here and there to your colleague, partners, employers, and clients. I am sure you know the feeling of waiting, right? Like how the plane got delayed for another hour or so.

But if you are in Indonesia, relax and don’t worry because there is a phrase that can let you pass the day without getting scolded even if you are late.
The phrase is ‘traffic jam’. Indonesian people, especially in big cities like Jakarta, are used to traffic jam. It is a real wonder that they can get by those daily heavy traffic jams.
The point is, if you are late, just say to everyone that you got stuck in a traffic jam. They, instead of getting angry and scold you, will let it go because they understand that traffic jams can really delay your arrival.

So, if you are working in Indonesia, don’t worry when you are late. Just say “I got stuck in a heavy traffic jam”, and there you go. No scolding sessions, no pay cuts. Just one suggestion, though, don’t abuse it.

(See this video about the new issue of Low Cost Green Car in Indonesia, will it increase the amount of traffic jam?)

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

In Indonesia, a Governor at Home on the Streets

Joko Widodo, the governor of Jakarta, made an unannounced visit to the Tanah Abang market in August, where he is a frequent visitor.

Joko Widodo, the governor of Jakarta, made an unannounced visit to the Tanah Abang market in August, where he is a frequent visitor.

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Each day, Joko Widodo, the governor of Jakarta, does something practically unheard-of among Indonesia’s political elite: he ventures into the streets to speak with the people who elected him.

Most times, he is mobbed as he wanders through the slums, traditional markets and other neighborhoods. Women, and men, try to touch him. Younger people grab his hands and lay them on their foreheads — a sign of respect. Many share their concerns over how their city is working (or not), a practice he encourages.

The people, he jokes, are not so much excited to see him; they are merely “shocked to see an Indonesian leader out of their office.”

“The people say it’s ‘street democracy’ because I go out to them,” said Mr. Joko, 52, whose supporters affectionately call him by his nickname, Jokowi. “I explain my programs. They can also give me ideas about programs.” He also drops in on local government and tax offices to let the city’s notoriously inefficient bureaucrats know he is watching.

That daily routine is one of the main reasons Mr. Joko, a reed-thin former furniture dealer, has almost overnight shot to the top of the polls about possible candidates for next year’s presidential election. In late August, the country’s most influential daily newspaper, Kompas, displayed his photo on its front page three days in a row along with poll results showing him with nearly double the support of the closest challenger, a retired Army general. The poll also found he had swept past the leader of his own party: former President Megawati Sukarnoputri, a famously imperious leader who sometimes referred to her supporters as “little people.”

“He’s the opposite of the leaders we have now. He doesn’t fit the mold at all,” said Bhimanto Suwastoyo, chief editor of the online Jakarta Globe. “The mold is: an Indonesian official does what he wants, has no connection with the people and doesn’t consult — he rules. Jokowi is doing the exact opposite. He’s hands on, he asks the public what they want, he approaches them and he’s seen as actually doing something.”

What Mr. Joko has accomplished in his first year leading the capital is not high-profile. In fact, people give him at least as much credit for what he appears not to have done. In a country rife with corruption, Mr. Joko is widely considered a clean politician who has not used his office to enrich himself, and who is working hard to cut down on corruption within the government.

The issue of official corruption is expected to be a major factor in the election, the third direct presidential election since the country threw off autocratic rule 15 years ago.

The economy has been doing well — it survived the world’s 2008 financial crisis virtually untouched, multinationals have been flocking here and its gross domestic product has expanded at a steady rate of more than 6 percent for the last three years. Still, analysts consistently say Indonesia is being held back from reaching its full potential because of corruption and collusion among government officials, lawmakers and powerful business interests.

The current president, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, swept into power in 2004 and was re-elected in 2009 on an anticorruption platform, but his governing Democratic Party has been mired in corruption scandals the past two years.

With months to go before the election, anything can happen to derail Mr. Joko’s chances. The retired general who ran second in the Kompas poll, Prabowo Subianto, has a strong following among the poor and has been considered a top contender for the presidency, despite widespread allegations of human rights abuses in East Timor. (Mr. Prabowo and Mr. Joko are members of opposition parties; Mr. Yudhoyono cannot run again because of term limits.)

Since becoming governor last October, Mr. Joko has followed through on his campaign promises, including issuing welfare payments on the equivalent of electronic gift cards that allow people to pay for health care and education supplies directly and ensure government officials do not take a cut off the top. He also instituted an online tax payment system to prevent graft and jump-started long-delayed plans for a mass rapid transit system for the capital.

He has invested the most effort and political capital on two projects in particular. The first was to move street vendors off the roads surrounding Tanah Abang, the largest textiles market in Southeast Asia, who were causing traffic jams throughout Central Jakarta, and give them space inside a nearby building. The second is the relocation of 7,000 poor families squatting around the Pluit Reservoir in North Jakarta into lost-cost public housing so the reservoir can be dredged for the first time in 30 years to help alleviate annual flooding.

These projects might seem obscure given the many pressing problems of a city of 10 million people, but they address the two most important ones for average people: traffic and flooding. To win community support, Mr. Joko visits both areas at least once daily to make sure that city officials are following through on the projects and to assure local residents that he is not really planning to turn the land over to shopping mall developers.

Mr. Joko’s “man of the people” tag is not concocted, analysts say. He is a former carpenter and ran a small furniture export business near Surakarta, a city of 520,000 people also known as Solo, before running for city mayor in 2005.

In 2012 he ran for governor in Jakarta, and his landslide win against the incumbent, Fauzi Bowo, who was backed by most of Mr. Yudhoyono’s governing coalition, was viewed as an emphatic rejection of the political establishment.

Mr. Joko ultimately will not decide whether he will run in the presidential election. Mrs. Megawati firmly controls the party, which decided at a recent congress that she alone would name its presidential nominee. She had been expected to run herself, but analysts say it is increasingly likely she will step aside for Mr. Joko to help her party try to regain the presidency after 10 years.

Party officials say Mrs. Megawati has hinted in recent weeks as much in recent weeks, calling herself at 66 “old” and “a grandmother.” Mrs. Megawati and Mr. Joko have also appeared side by side at party events in recent weeks, prompting even more speculation about his candidacy.

Source : The New York Times

Cross the street anywhere you want

In most countries, you cannot cross the road anywhere you want because it is dangerous and you can get fined by a traffic police. Besides, surely there is a crossing bridges or zebra cross around for pedestrians to cross the street. Even though sometimes it’s not convenient when you are in a hurry, using the zebra cross or crossing bridges is far safer. So why take the risk?

BUT in Indonesia, no matter if you are in a hurry or not, you can cross the road anywhere you want. You don’t need to look for zebra cross or crossing bridges.
For car or motorcycle drivers, you need to be extra careful because who knows if there is any people crossing the street or not.
Furthermore, traffic jam in Jakarta is often caused by many people crossing the street in any way they want. Hence, the cars and motorcycles must stop to let the people cross.
But then again, looking at how pedestrians’ rights are taken by the other irresponsible street users, maybe it’s not that weird.

(See this tutorial video to see the danger of crossing the street in Jakarta, Indonesia)
To cross the street, you need to be very brave. You need to look for the delay between the traffic. The cars and motors will hopefully notice you and slow down their vehicles.
Well, this is Indonesia. A unique country where you need a tutorial just to cross a normal street.
(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

Batik, informally formal business outfit

I am sure most people anywhere in this world are dressed formally when they are working. Even though the fashion for business outfits varies nowadays, the theme seems to be in uniform. Either it is a shirt with a tie and a coat, or  just a shirt. I bet most of them are bored as they always wear the same model but only with different colors every day in their office. Not to mention, the suffocating feeling of buttoning your neck or the stiff shoulder due to limited body movement. This, of course, can make working in the office become so tiring. But if you are lucky, you might be working at a formal place with informal outfits.

Well, if you wear that in Indonesia and using public transportation, get ready to sweat a lot and making your formal suit becomes a lot more uncomfortable.
The hot temperature added with pollution and crowded public transportation is not really the situation you would want to be in with your formal suit.

BUT do you know that there is an informal suit that can be worn formally in Indonesia? Even directors can wear it.
‘Batik’ is an Indonesian native cultural heritage and it is the identity for Indonesia itself. Because of the design and color, batik is a unique clothings with patterns different from other clothings. The batik clothing is more refreshing if compared to typical formal suits. The material is thinner so it is suitable for a tropical country like Indonesia.
When you wear it, you also don’t need to button your neck so it is not suffocating. It also comes with short sleeve or long sleeve, a very refreshing companion to be worn in a hot country.

(See this video below about how to make Batik clothings)

Too bad most Indonesian people think that the Batik clothings is not cool and therefore they don’t use it.
The way to appreciate and love our own country is begun from small and simple things like wearing batik as an example,
But they don’t really need to appreciate it. Clothings are meant to be worn, not appreciated, and it is never wrong to wear Batik because it is, after all, the same level with the formal suits.
Now you can see the business opportunity from having a Batik clothing business, right?

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

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