Complete Information on Indonesia

Archive for October, 2013

Dishwasher without electricity? What for?

In the United States or other countries, dishwasher is considered to be the most useful thing. People eat two to three times per day, and of course, they eat by using plates, spoons, and forks.
That also means they need extra energy to wash their dishes later on after eating, but that hassle could be good as gone if they have a dishwasher.

But do you know that in Indonesia, a dishwasher does not have any value at all? This is because not all people in Indonesia can afford to have a dishwasher in their kitchen.
In fact, not all family or houses has a kitchen. Even if they have a decent kitchen, it is not worth the electricity to run it as it will cause a blackout because the electric current is not enough.

All places in Indonesia must suffer from a blackout every now and then, and it is far worse in the remote areas. While Jakarta can have blackout once per month, remote areas can have blackout twice or thrice per week.
Since Java island is the centralized and concentrated one, it does not have as many blackouts as in other places in Indonesia. On Sumatra island, the blackout can occur once a week and for a long time like 1 to 8 hours. Think about the money and time lost just for one blackout.

However, the Indonesian people are quick in recognizing business opportunities. Besides candle, a genset is what everybody needs. Every big factory and office building or malls usually have this genset as their backup source of electricity in case of blackout. This is why the genset market in Indonesia is very wide.

Unfortunately, knowing the importance of genset does not mean that everybody in Indonesia has one. Like in the video below, a football stadium does not have a genset and thus have nothing to do when the blackout happens.

But then again, that can also mean that there will still be potential buyers, right?

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

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Nyethe, one of many undiscovered culture in Indonesia

When you go to Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, then you will hear an unfamiliar Indonesian term which is ‘nyethe‘.
Nyethe‘ is an activity of painting the cigar’s body with coffee dregs. Yes, you always hear painter paints on a blank canvas or papers, but this is new and unique, right?

The culture is born in an ordinary local coffee shop, where people come to sip a cup of black coffee or ‘kopi tubruk’, or smoking, and have a chit chat. (See this post to know more about it)

Courtesy are given to those in the description

Some of the visitors have the skill to do the activity of ‘nyethe‘. He uses the coffee dregs and a toothpick to paint the cigar’s body. It looks easy to do it but it turns out that you need patience and creativity, or you will end up scribbling randomly.

You can now see the market opportunity too, right? The amount of smoker and coffee drinker in Indonesia is pretty high. Investing in the coffee is wise since one Indonesian can drink coffee as much as three times a day. You can count that by at least 10 million people.

(See this video about a person who do the ‘nyethe‘ with a spoon, not a toothpick)

Indonesian people can be considered to be very uniquely creative, aren’t they? They can invent such an activity of art with no big cost at all, but of course, the danger of smoking and drinking coffee too much is still there.
Well, that’s the uniqueness of Indonesia.

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

‘Kopi Tubruk’, the black coffee that glued Indonesians together

As I have mentioned in this post, the strong sense of equality and togetherness along with the tradition are what makes Indonesian people get together just to hang out and chit chat.
It is also the same reason to why Indonesian people gather at a local coffee shop.

Coffee drinkers are greater in numbers than tea drinkers in Indonesia. All around the country, the coffee market has been ruled by Starbucks, Coffee Bean, Bengawan Solo, and many other brands. They taste good, but something is different about those brands which cannot be felt unless you come to a local coffee shop.

Courtesy is given to those in the description

Yes, it is all about getting together and comfortable with your friends. Something you cannot do in a classy typical Starbucks place unless you want to be seen as a villager who does not know how to behave in a city.

Kopi Tubruk‘ (clashing coffee or colliding coffee) is the most favorite coffee to accompany them. The brewing is simple and fast. The price is also cheap, which is only about IDR 3.000 ( US $ 0,3 ) in a local coffee shop. They are made by pouring boiling water into a cup filled with coarsely grounded coffee and sugar, which then comes out internationally as black coffee, and yes, the dregs are still there. It is different, however, from an instant coffee that comes in a sachet.

Courtesy are given to those in the description

It really is all about getting together, watching a football competition in television, sipping the coffee while playing chess and having a chit chat.

Courtesy are given to those in the description

There is also no rule. The customers can freely lay down, playing chess or cards for hours, no dress code required (you can even come with no tops on), you can laugh out loud, or even sleep until the next sun rises and the owner wakes you up.

This culture of drinking coffee in Indonesia is thanks to the Dutch who introduced coffee in the 17th century. Indonesia was seen as a heaven for coffee plantation thanks to its perfect climate and soil to cultivate the bean. Now, Indonesia ranks the 4th for the largest coffee producer in the world.

(See this video about an Indonesian person making a ‘kopi tubruk‘)

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

Public transportation in Indonesia has its level increased

Public transportation anywhere in the world has always been praised for being advanced, practical, and clean. Those three features, after all, are the ones that make people choose to ride public transportation rather than driving with their own vehicle.

But when you come to Indonesia, specifically to Padang, West Sumatra, you will be awed by a new level of public transportation which does not boast about its cleanliness and practicality.

Padang, West Sumatra

Padang, West Sumatra

What you will see is art. The public transportation there, the ‘angkot‘ (‘angkutan kota’ / town transportation), has a paint job and vinyls here and there, making it look like a racing car. They also have TV, sound system, and speakers or subwoofers, colorful lights, to make the vehicle become a moving place for disco. All of them are designed for customers to enjoy the ride.

The downside of this is that they have to fill or change their accumulator because it surely wastes a big amount of it by turning on the TV, subwoofers, and the lights. However, considering the amount of customers they could get by this modification, a little extra money spent for the accumulator is not really a big deal.

(See this video below about the ‘angkot‘ in Padang)

It is so hilarious that you can’t help but being curious, right? Well, that’s another uniqueness of Indonesia.

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

Modified transporter in Indonesia

We all know now that in Indonesia, the best transportation would be ‘ojek’ or motor taxi, because it can slip past the traffic jam quickly. You can read this post to know more about it. At most, they can bring 2 to 3 people at once or some things.

But do you know that somewhere in Tasikmalaya, there is a modified transporter? It is an ordinary transporter but they can bring many people at once like 7 – 10 people, and they can even bring  many woodblocks.

Cipatujah, Tasikmalaya, Indonesia

Say hello to these brave people who risk their lives and their motors to transport these people and heavy woodblocks.

Usually, they are paid for IDR 150.000 – 250.000 ( US $ 15 – 25 ) per trip, but is it really worth the danger? How would they turn their motor? How would they brake and have the woodblocks unmoved when they brake in a downhill slope?

They reflect the needs of efficiency for Indonesian people. They realize that to transport many people or things, they need to go back and forth several times, and that is a waste of gasoline. Then, they take the market opportunity to transport all at once or in one trip. Pretty uniquely clever, right?

(See this video about them, they can even go through bumpy roads and still keep their balance)

Well, Indonesia is really a place with countless uniqueness, right?

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

The bad economy is caused by national holidays?

On average, the national holidays of any country in the world are around 10-15 days per year. This creates a good place for competition in factory or other industries, because the less national holidays they have, the more productions can be made. Countries like China, has its workers work 48 hours per week, and the workers are paid based on how many pieces of clothing they make in a clothing factory. You can imagine the efficiency and the productivity, right?

National holidays

But do you know that in Indonesia, the national holidays are around 28-32 days per year. This is because Indonesia embraces its diversity in religions by celebrating each religion’s big day as national holidays. Not to mention, Indonesia has a strange day called ‘stuck’ day. It’s a normal working day but can be declared as a holiday because that day is in the middle of national holidays. So, for example, Sunday is a holiday and the Tuesday is one of the national holidays, then the Monday will be a holiday too.

Red date

One can safely think that Indonesian people are very laid-back. Not only the national holidays have given Indonesian people enough leisure, the factory workers only work for 40 hours per week and yet, they still complain about it. This, of course, affects Indonesian’s economy. How would Indonesia compete with other developing countries if the national holiday system itself is too laid back? But then again, thanks to that system, one can really have a laid-back life and truly enjoy the leisure of holidays.

(See this video below about the latest decision from the President of Indonesia regarding the worker day to be a national holiday)

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

The sharp trap of hell in Indonesia

There are many markets or business opportunities that are still unseen or hidden from most people’s eyes.
Indonesian people, however, are very keen on seeing them.
Like an artisan coffee seller with bicycle, not long after that, there comes an herbal drink seller with bicycle.
Or the growing-to-be-famous online shop with unique stuffs.

But, there are some people who create the opportunity in the wrong way, like these people mentioned in this post.
Flat tire issues do not always happen, so these people are actually experiencing a great deficit.
So, what do they do? They scatter nails on the road or the street not far from their patch-up places.

The nails collected by officers from the street

The nails collected by an officer from the street

Try to drive in a 30 km/hours, and pay careful attention to the street.

If your vehicle got the nail, don’t panic and try to pull over after you are sure it’s safe, and take the nail. If you insist on driving, the tire can tear and become worse.

When you get your tire patched up, watch carefully because often they will sabotage your tire and make it worse. Thus, you have to pay more to change to a new tire with the price ranging from IDR 30.000 to IDR 45.000 ( $US 3 to 4,5).

The officers from a community once collected 300 kg worth of nails just in the area of Central Jakarta.
Some streets that are usually scattered in nail are the Daan Mogot, Hasyim Ashari, Medan Merdeka Utara, Senen market area, Pulogadung area, and Cawang area.

(See this video below about the nails scattered on the street to Soekarno Hatta airport)

Sure, it is great to be able to create the business opportunity which means more income or benefits. But doing it with this kind of act is really unacceptable, isn’t it?

(Credits go respectfully to the rightful owner)

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